Uncategorized

In need

20140726-185340.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How Not to Catch Surf Perch

I knew, somewhere in my mind, that I really should not be fishing right now. The wind was blowing the snow into drifts, then the drifts were being covered with sand and then snow, sand, snow. Creating this mesmerizing layer cake pattern as I punched holes into the drifts with my hip-wader boots. The slowly receding tide was freezing as it rolled out, the breaking ice caused crunching noises as I walked. But, I do not make it to the coast often, so I needed to take advantage of this surf perch fishing opportunity.

Why? Because I have never caught one. Like ever. Seriously, never. Embarrassing, right?Bait/Dinner

This boney little fish has become my nemesis in the Pacific Ocean. I wish it was a white whale, or a blue marlin or even a sail fish in Cabo San Lucas. But no, it’s a perch…but it’s not for a lack of trying.

Frankly, I am at a loss at why I cannot seem to land this bluegill of the sea. I watch people catch five gallon buckets full, tossing out little hunks of clam and sand shrimp that look no different from my bait. Fishing is one of my strong points as an outdoorsman; I know when to set the hook.

I have fished for surf perch during low tide, high tide, slack tide, hot weather, snow storms and rain storms. The one saving grace about my perch deficit is that I It seems that I can catch everything but surf perch. To date I have caught off the coast of Central Oregon and Northern California the following species – bream, grouper, mackerel, rockfish (like 10 types), lingcod, Dungeness crab, red crab, greenling and one ugly SOB I could not identify so I tossed it back.

Almost all of these species are great eating. The only one that is questionable is mackerel, this is a fishy-fish. Some say that all mackerel is good for is cat food. I disagree; it also makes wonderful bait and exceptional sushi.

Over the years of not catching surf perch I have come up with a 3 golden rules, if I follow these rules (I nearly compulsively do) I can almost guarantee myself a deficit of surf perch.

Rule #1 – Fish Near the Rocks

Being an inland fisherman I have a habit of looking for structure when I fish. The idea of simply casting off the sand out into the surf is hard for me to swallow. I assume that fish want something to hide behind or near or whatever. Just like my lake fish and river trout.

But, as I have learned, surf perch have no fascination with this structure. They instead live in that little trough that is formed by the waves digging a small hole in the sandy bottom. This trough stirs up all sorts of critters and sends them floating into the deep blue sea. The surf perch eat the little crabs and clams that the ocean stirs up. For a fisherman then the goal, or so I am told, is to cast a hunk of meat into the trough and hope that a perch strikes.

If you want to pretend to be perch fishing than you should fish near rock out cropping’s or off jetties. What I do is cast out into the surf, simply guessing where the trough is, and with every intention that a surf perch will bite. Then I slowly retrieve my line towards the rocks. I feel more comfortable this way, even if it is totally wrong. Fishing this way and will almost certainly land you something other than a perch.

Rule #2 – Don’t Poke Pole

In a fit of boredom during low tide I started dropping my bait into deep looking holes in the Newport Jetty. Craziest part…I caught a bunch of fish. Only later did I find out that this is a honest to goodness technique, a less refined version at least, of “poke-polling”. The basics of this fishing method are simple – shove bait into the face of an otherwise unbothered fish. The real key to success is constant movement and hole selection. Basically if something doesn’t bite in the first few seconds switch locations. Just keep bumping down the jetty or rocks looking for a fish to bite. One morning I caught 7 in under an hour. I tossed all but one back but it was a great way to kill a little time wishing a perch would bite.

For better success only drop the bait into deep holes, specifically ones where the bottom cannot be seen. As far as set up is concerned I use the typical surf perch rig, drop shot with two hooks coming off the main line. I use clam, squid, shrimp or artificial night crawler. At the Newport Jetty the most common species caught poke polling will be greenling. I hear that along the coast of northern California you catch monkey faced eels. Not bad options when the Surf Perch refuse to bite.

Rule #3 – Don’t Judge the Man Fishing a Bobber

Look, bobbers and jigs work. Just not on surf perch. What I do is set up a ½ ounce head on one of those big red bobbers from Kmart, maybe about 4 feet of line between the two. Then I’ll cast along the rocks and slowly retrieve. I have nailed the heck out of some rockfish this way before. I have never heard of a surf perch caught in this fashion.

A bobber and a sabiki rig (one of those multiple hook jig contraptions) cast into the surf is a total and complete loss. Never ever do that – you end up with a ball of string and hooks. I have caught a whole bunch of bream with a sabiki and a bobber along the rocks, however.

How to Cook Bait

Some days you win big fishing, some days you do not. This recipe is for a day when you are forced to eat what most others call bait. It’s not halibut, salmon or lingcod – but this recipe will give you crispy skinned fish with great garlic and mustard flavors.

The Bait

8 ea small “Bream” or other bait fish, cleaned and descaled

¼ cup canola oil

1 cup flour

1 tablespoon mustard seed powder

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon black pepper, ground

1 tablespoon garlic powderGreens and Fish

In a medium sized cast iron skillet (they hold heat better, but are not absolutely critical) add the oil and turn to “medium” heat. The goal is to get to about 350 degrees. Turn on the oven to “warm” or the lowest setting possible.

To check the temperature of the oil on the stove simply drop small clumps of batter into the oil filled pan. When the batter bubbles quickly and then floats the oil is close to the correct temperature. If the small scrap of batter browns or burns quickly than the oil is too hot.

Combine flour and all spices in a bowl. Wet the fish slightly and then dredge in flour. Wet again and re-dredge. This double batter will stick better than a single layer. Double batter all fish and reserve on a slightly flowered cookie sheet.

Fry the fish for 3-4 minutes on each side, or until the fish turns golden brown and delicious (GB&D). Transfer the cooked fish onto paper towel lined cookie sheet in the warmed oven.

The Green Stuff

To compensate for the fried food I always like a little sautéed super-food as accompaniment. Oh, and mustard greens taste great too.

1 tablespoon butter

1# Mustard Greens

4 cloves Garlic, crushed

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon Sriracha

Salt and Pepper

In a medium sauté pan add the butter melt on medium heat. Next add the mustard greens and garlic cloves. Cook 2-3 minutes until wilted and tender. Taste – if to bitter add the sugar. If it has no flavor then add the Sriracha. Mustard greens vary from field to field and day to day on the spiciness level. Either way, season with salt and pepper.

Serve the greens over the top of the fried fish.

Categories: Blog, Fish, Recipes, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Alaska Caribou Photos

As the days grow shorter and my memory fades I am posting this photo blog about caribou hunting in Alaska. These photos are the ones that bring me back. Back to the soggy ground, back to the sore back, back to the feeling of invincibility. The hunt was unguided, DIY caribou 2500 miles from my home. I am proud of what we did, it was truly grand. I’d do it again any day, not sure the folks who went with me would.

I type this eating sushi at the San Francisco airport, wanting nothing more than to be home. But travel is necessary for work. It is a short life we all have, I realize that more and more each year. Kids are born and the generation above me ages. Shit happens and cancer sucks.

Next time I’m in Alaska, I hope to have my son with me. It will make one of those unforgettable family moments…much like the one I just had with my father.

 

20130923-083804.jpg20130923-083812.jpg

 

20130923-083839.jpg20130923-083849.jpg

 

20130923-083859.jpg20130923-083909.jpg

 

20130923-083916.jpg20130923-083925.jpg

 

20130923-093133.jpg

Categories: Blog, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dove Pot Pie

Chicken pot pie as a staple growing up. I wish I could tell the world that my family made them from scratch but, more often than not, they were the pre frozen variety. Those little pies still hold a good place in my heart, mostly because they taste really really IMG_0128good. I am doing my best to upscale this concept with a little collard dove meat and some granny smith apples while at the same time keep it true to the original.

Recipe –

Dove Pot Pie Filling

2 slices of bacon, sliced into thin strips

4 dove, cut into breasts, legs and with heart and liver

½ cup diced carrot

½ cup diced celery

1 cup diced onion

2 cloves of garlic, chopped

2 ea diced granny smith apples (or other firm, baking apple)

3 tablespoons flour

1.5 cups milk

½ cup apple juice

Salt

Pepper

Fresh Sage

1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded or cut into slabs

“Pie” crust – See note below

Heat oven to 400 degrees.

In a medium sized stock pot add the sliced bacon and cook it until it is crispy. Next add the dove meat, the heart and liver are a great addition in this recipe. When the meat is brown add the carrot, celery, onion, garlic and apple. Cook until the onion starts to turn translucent. Next add the flour and incorporate into the cooking vegetables and meat. Then add the milk, and apple juice. Cook this mixture on medium until it begins to thicken. Then turn to low heat and let fully thicken. Season and taste mix with salt and pepper. Add the fresh sage and taste.

Separate the mixture into baking dishes, making sure each dish has two breasts, two legs a heart and a liver. Top the mix with cheese. Then top with the “pie” crust – see the Note below.

Bake until the biscuit is golden brown and the mixture inside is bubbling. About 20 minutes at 400 degrees. Serve hot.

Note – When I make a pot pie crust I normally cheat and use Bisquick. It is totally a scam, I know, but a nice biscuit crust is better, quicker and easier than a labored pie crust. In my opinion. That said, I prepare Bisquick to the box specifications and then roll out my “pie” lit on a well-floured cutting board. I use a knife and the baking dish I am using to cut the shape. Then I will fill the dish and crimp the dough ends over my baking dish.

IMG_0106 IMG_0107 IMG_0108 IMG_0109  IMG_0122 IMG_0114 IMG_0113 IMG_0110

Categories: Birds, Not Waterfowl, Recipes, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Frog Legs from a Southern Fellow

Don’t mess with perfection. Those Southern Boys and Girls who love them some good ol’ fashioned fried frog legs are onto something; they are delicious. This recipe comes courtesy of my East Texas buddy John and is how is Mamma makes his frog legs. For those of you not familiar with East Texas it is basically Louisiana but they still have that Texas pride.

Fried Frog Legs

After you process the frogs – cut them in half and then pretend you are taking the pants off them with a pair of pliers, no joke. You should soak them in salt water for a day. This will do two things. One, it will make most of the big black veins turn translucent and thus more palatable to those who do not eat frog. Second the salt water will brine the frogs, keeping them moister during the cooking process.
Cooking them is easy to “get a Dutch oven and fill it with about two or three inches of fry oil. You know Crisco or canola, whatever” said John. Then you need to “pat the frogs off with a paper towel. Then roll them in season flour, put them in milk and then season flour again.”
“Then you deep fry them until they are brown” simple John said.

Frog Flour
12 “pairs” of frog legs
1 cup flour
1 teaspoon “Red Pepper” AKA cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon pepper

3 cups Crisco, or enough to fill a Dutch Oven 2-3 inches
1 cup milk

Heat oil and Dutch on the stove. Cook until a wooden spoon floats and gives off small bubbles or about 350 degrees on a candy thermometer. Keep at that heat.
Mix all the dry ingredients with the flour in a small bowl. Reserve.
Pour milk in into a small bowl.
Pat the frogs dry after soaking them. Roll them in season flour, then dunk them in milk. This will create a sticky surface for the second dredging of flour. Next roll and slightly press the flour again on the frog legs.
Fry the legs, sets of three at a time, until golden brown. Fry time is about 4- 5 minutes. Transfer them to a paper towel lined plate. Serve hot. Squeeze some lemon on them if you want. Or just drub down on them!

20130710-182309.jpg

20130710-182329.jpg

20130710-182345.jpg

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 196 other followers